Research on attachment

Infant attachment[ edit ] The attachment system serves to achieve or maintain proximity to the attachment figure. In close physical proximity this system is not activated, and the infant can direct its attention to the outside world.

Research on attachment

Infant Research on attachment edit ] The attachment system serves to achieve or maintain proximity to the attachment figure. In close physical proximity this system is not activated, and the infant can direct its attention to the outside world.

Within attachment theory, attachment means "a biological instinct in which proximity to an attachment figure is sought when the child senses or perceives threat or discomfort. Attachment behaviour anticipates a response by the attachment figure which will remove threat or discomfort".

John Bowlby begins by noting organisms at different levels of the phylogenetic scale regulate instinctive behavior in distinct ways, ranging from primitive reflex-like "fixed action patterns" to complex plan hierarchies with subgoals and strong learning components.

In the most complex organisms, instinctive behaviors may be "goal-corrected" with continual on-course adjustments such as a bird of prey adjusting its flight to the movements of the prey. Such flexible organisms pay a price, however, because adaptable behavioral systems can more easily be subverted from their optimal path of development.

Research on attachment

For humans, Bowlby speculates, the Research on attachment of evolutionary adaptedness probably resembles present-day hunter-gatherer societies for the purpose of survival, and, ultimately, genetic replication. These figures are arranged hierarchically, with the principal attachment figure at the top.

Anxiety is the anticipation or fear of being cut off from the attachment figure. If the figure is unavailable or unresponsive, separation distress occurs.

Threats to security in older children and adults arise from prolonged absence, breakdowns in communication, emotional unavailability, or signs of rejection or abandonment. A securely attached baby is free to concentrate on their environment. The attachment behavioural system serves to achieve or maintain proximity to the attachment figure.

During the first phase the first eight weeksinfants smile, babble, and cry to attract the attention of potential caregivers. Although infants of this age learn to discriminate between caregivers, these behaviours are directed at anyone in the vicinity.

During the second phase two to six monthsthe infant discriminates between familiar and unfamiliar adults, becoming more responsive toward the caregiver; following and clinging are added to the range of behaviours. If the caregiver is inaccessible or unresponsive, attachment behaviour is more strongly exhibited.

For example, whereas babies cry because of pain, two-year-olds cry to summon their caregiver, and if that does not work, cry louder, shout, or follow. Tenets[ edit ] Common attachment behaviours and emotions, displayed in most social primates including humans, are adaptive.

Attachment in children - Wikipedia

The long-term evolution of these species has involved selection for social behaviors that make individual or group survival more likely. The commonly observed attachment behaviour of toddlers staying near familiar people would have had safety advantages in the environment of early adaptation, and has similar advantages today.

Bowlby saw the environment of early adaptation as similar to current hunter-gatherer societies. According to Bowlby, proximity-seeking to the attachment figure in the face of threat is the "set-goal" of the attachment behavioural system.

Early experiences with caregivers gradually give rise to a system of thoughts, memories, beliefs, expectations, emotions, and behaviours about the self and others. These researchers have shown there is indeed a sensitive period during which attachments will form if possible, but the time frame is broader and the effect less fixed and irreversible than first proposed.

With further research, authors discussing attachment theory have come to appreciate social development is affected by later as well as earlier relationships. Early steps in attachment take place most easily if the infant has one caregiver, or the occasional care of a small number of other people.

According to Bowlby, almost from the beginning, many children have more than one figure toward whom they direct attachment behaviour.

These figures are not treated alike; there is a strong bias for a child to direct attachment behaviour mainly toward one particular person.

Bowlby used the term "monotropy" to describe this bias. Rather, current thinking postulates definite hierarchies of relationships. This system, called the "internal working model of social relationships", continues to develop with time and experience.

As they develop in line with environmental and developmental changes, they incorporate the capacity to reflect and communicate about past and future attachment relationships. This internal working model continues to develop through adulthood, helping cope with friendships, marriage, and parenthood, all of which involve different behaviours and feelings.

Specific attachment behaviours begin with predictable, apparently innate, behaviours in infancy. They change with age in ways determined partly by experiences and partly by situational factors. This dyadic model is not the only strategy of attachment producing a secure and emotionally adept child.

Having a single, dependably responsive and sensitive caregiver namely the mother does not guarantee the ultimate success of the child. Results from Israeli, Dutch and east African studies show children with multiple caregivers grow up not only feeling secure, but developed "more enhanced capacities to view the world from multiple perspectives.

So while the mother is important, she is not the only opportunity for relational attachment a child can make. Several group members with or without blood relation contribute to the task of bringing up a child, sharing the parenting role and therefore can be sources of multiple attachment.

There is evidence of this communal parenting throughout history that "would have significant implications for the evolution of multiple attachment.

The Strange Situation Protocol[ edit ] The most common and empirically supported method for assessing attachment in infants 11 months—17 months is the Strange Situation Protocol, developed by Mary Ainsworth as a result of her careful in-depth observations of infants with their mothers in Baltimore, USA see below.

The clinical concept of RAD differs in a number of fundamental ways from the theory and research driven attachment classifications based on the Strange Situation Procedure.Attachment theory is a psychological model attempting to describe the dynamics of long-term and short-term interpersonal relationships between humans.

"Attachment theory is not formulated as a general theory of relationships; it addresses only a specific facet": how human beings respond within relationships when hurt, separated from loved ones, or perceiving a threat. Research Attachment for Overseas Singaporeans (RAOS) Singaporean students currently pursuing their undergraduate or Masters education overseas can participate in short-term research attachments at A*STAR through the Research Attachment for Overseas Singaporeans (RAOS).

Summary. Research on adult attachment is guided by the assumption that the same motivational system that gives rise to the close emotional bond between parents and their children is responsible for the bond that develops . Attachment theory has been generating creative and impactful research for almost half a century.

In this article we focus on the documented antecedents and consequences of individual differences in infant attachment patterns, suggesting topics for further theoretical clarification, research, clinical interventions, and policy applications.

Jun 29,  · Follow the page limits specified below for the attachments in your grant application, unless otherwise specified in the funding opportunity announcement (FOA).

"This third edition of Cassidy and Shaver's Handbook will be an instant classic, like prior ph-vs.com contributors are a 'who's who' in the field. The chapter coverage is exhaustive and timely in its treatment of long-standing and emerging issues in attachment theory and research, such as measurement, biological influences, interventions, and special populations.

A Brief Overview of Adult Attachment Theory and Research | R. Chris Fraley